Job protection reform in India

Sean Dougherty, Veronica Frisancho, Kala Krishna 08 May 2014

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India has some of the more restrictive labour laws in the world, but a large informal sector to which these do not apply. Therefore, firms thinking of growing in size and becoming formal must trade off the advantages of size with the disadvantages of facing regulations. This dilemma keeps Indian firms small and informal unless they have a lot to gain by growing, i.e. when they are very good indeed.

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  India, labour market reform

Avoiding middle-income growth traps

Pierre-Richard Agénor, Otaviano Canuto, Michael Jelenic 21 December 2012

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In the postwar era, many countries have managed to quickly reach middle-income status, but few have gone on to become high-income economies1. Rather, after an initial period of rapid ascent, many countries have experienced a sharp slowdown in growth and productivity, falling into what has been called a ‘middle-income trap’:

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Topics:  Development International trade Labour markets Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  income, innovation, labour market reform, investment, middle income

Ending the scourge of dual labour markets in Europe

Samuel Bentolila, Tito Boeri, Pierre Cahuc 12 July 2010

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Never before has a crisis been so concentrated on youth in a large part due to labour market dualism – i.e. situations where there is a big difference between temporary- and permanent-contract workers. During this crisis there has not only been a hiring freeze but also mass layoffs of temporary-contract workers (typically held by younger workers).

As a result:

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Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Labour markets Welfare state and social Europe

Tags:  labour market reform, Eurozone crisis, Dualism

France: The price of suspicion

Yann Algan, Pierre Cahuc 25 November 2007

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France is in the throes of a vicious circle – one that has considerable economic and social costs. For over 20 years, surveys carried out in developed countries reveal that the French, more so than elsewhere, don’t trust their fellow citizens. They’re the most likely to mistrust public powers, social partners, and the justice system. They are also the most resistant to the market economy.

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  France, competition, mistrust, labour market reform, retirement policy

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