Dirty little secrets: Inferring fossil-fuel subsidies from patterns in emission intensities

Radek Stefanski, 30 May 2014

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An astonishing feature of international energy and climate policy is that fossil fuels – often seen as the primary contributor to climate change – receive enormous government support (IMF 2013, IEA 2012). Surprisingly, no comprehensive database of directly measured, comparable fossil-fuel subsidies exists at the international level.

Topics: Energy, Environment
Tags: carbon, emissions, energy, energy subsidy, fossil fuels, pollution, subsidies

Climate policy targets revisited

Richard S J Tol, 25 April 2014

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The Stern Review of the Economics of Climate Change is the most famous economic assessment of climate policy (Stern et al. 2006).

Topics: Environment
Tags: carbon, climate change, cost-benefit analysis, emissions, externalities, greenhouse gases, pollution

The housing-market impacts of shale-gas development

Lucija Muehlenbachs, Beia Spiller, Christopher Timmins, 9 February 2014

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Technological improvements in the extraction of natural gas from shale rock have transformed the industry.

Topics: Energy, Environment
Tags: externalities, fracking, house prices, housing, pollution, property prices, shale gas

Market mechanisms for regulation: Cap-and-trade and Obamacare

Jeffrey Frankel, 27 February 2014

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Markets can fail. But market mechanisms are often the best way for governments to address such failures. This has been demonstrated in areas from air pollution, to traffic congestion, to spectrum allocation, to cigarette consumption.

Topics: Environment, Politics and economics
Tags: Cap-and-trade, environment, EU ETS, global warming, healthcare, market-based mechanisms, Obamacare, pollution, regulation

Can passenger railways curb road-traffic externalities? Empirical evidence

Rafael Lalive, Simon Luechinger, Armin Schmutzler, 15 March 2013

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Road accidents kill 1.2m people every year (WHO). Road transportation is the main source of local air pollutants such as nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide. It contributes to noise and global air pollution, and it leads to congestion. Against this backdrop, many governments subsidise railways with the explicit aim of reducing road-traffic externalities.

Topics: Environment, Frontiers of economic research, Productivity and Innovation
Tags: externalities, infrastructure, pollution, railways, trains

Does Supporting Passenger Railways Reduce Road Traffic Externalities?

Rafael Lalive, Simon Luechinger, Armin Schmutzler, 10 February 2013

Vox readers can download CEPR Discussion Paper 9335 for free here.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP9335.asp
Topics: Industrial organisation
Tags: pollution, public transport, railways, road accidents

Are property values affected by concerns over groundwater contamination from shale?

Lucija Muehlenbachs, Beia Spiller, Christopher Timmins, 29 September 2012

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A recent increase in the extraction of natural gas and oil using unconventional methods has transformed communities and landscapes. Shale gas extraction has grown rapidly in recent years thanks to developments in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

Topics: Energy, Environment
Tags: externalities, natural gas, pollution, property prices

Identifying the worldwide pollution haven effect

Jean-Marie Grether, Nicole A. Mathys, Jaime de Melo, 23 December 2010

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For the environmentally minded, globalisation reflected in rising trade shares in world GDP is worrisome. Globalisation is a direct concern because the activity of trading itself generates pollution through the transport of goods (Hummels 2009 and Grether et al.

Topics: Environment, International trade
Tags: environment, globalisation, pollution

The rise of “consumer cities” in China

Matthew E. Kahn, Siqi Zheng, 14 April 2009

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China’s population is rapidly urbanising. The share of the population living in cities in China increased from 28% in 1990 to 44% in 2006. The annual real wage of an average urban worker in 2006 was four times higher than in 1990.

Topics: Development, Environment
Tags: China, cities, environmental Kuznets curve, green amenities, pollution

Trade growth, global production, and environmental degradation

Judith M. Dean , Mary E. Lovely, 14 May 2008

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The sheer scale of China's recent trade growth and its environmental degradation are unprecedented.1 In current dollars, the value of China’s exports plus imports rose from $280.9 billion in 1995 to $1422.1 billion in 2005 – a growth of over 400%.

Topics: Environment, International trade
Tags: China, environment, pollution, trade growth

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