Philippe Bacchetta, Kenza Benhima, Céline Poilly, Thursday, February 19, 2015

The corporate cash ratio – the share of liquid assets in total assets – comoves with employment in the US. This column argues that disentangling liquidity shocks and credit shocks is key to understanding this comovement, and that liquidity shocks appear to be crucial. These shocks make production less attractive or more difficult to finance, while they also generate a need for internal liquidity to pay wages, which can be satisfied by holding more cash.

Tatiana Didier, Roberto Rigobon, Sergio Schmukler, Monday, November 12, 2012

Investment through global funds increases year on year. But how and where are global funds’ portfolios allocated? How and which recipient countries, underlying investors, and policymakers benefit? This column argues that global funds in fact represent restrictive investment practises. If we want as many countries, investors and companies to benefit as possible, we must aim to change global funds’ organisational structures and thereby managers’ behaviour.

Kathryn Graddy, Friday, January 4, 2008

The market for unusual assets has grown in recent years. Here is a column that reviews the evidence on the market for violins, showing that they have provided a relatively stable return, with low, and in some cases negative, correlation to other assets.

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