What good are children?

Angus Deaton, Arthur Stone, 4 March 2014

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It is a commonplace that new parents are overwhelmed by a “tsunami of love” when they first meet their dependent offspring. Older children, though often a source of irritation and worry, are also a source of joy, and there are few parents who can even bear to think of a world without their children.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: children, happiness, life satisfaction

Measuring economic progress

Diane Coyle, 17 February 2014

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The debate about how best to measure economic activity dates back to well before the ‘invention’ of GDP by Richard Stone and others during the Second World War (Stone 1947). The earliest attempt was William Petty’s 1665 estimate of income and expenditure in England and Wales, followed by a variety of other approaches in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: GDP measurement, happiness, hedonic price index

GDP and life satisfaction: New evidence

Eugenio Proto, Aldo Rustichini, 11 January 2014

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A commission on the measurement of economic performance and social progress was created on the French government’s initiative. Since 2008, this distinguished group of social scientists has put subjective well-being into the limelight as a possible supplement to traditional measures of development such as GDP (Stiglitz et al. 2009).

Topics: Development, Frontiers of economic research
Tags: development, Easterlin paradox, growth, happiness, national income, subjective well-being

Happiness and voting

Federica Liberini, Eugenio Proto, Michela Redoano, 15 November 2013

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The idea that states should support and protect citizens’ wellbeing goes back at least two hundred and fifty years – as stated in the 1776 US Declaration of Independence.1

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: happiness, subjective wellbeing, voting

The midlife crisis in humans and other apes

Andrew J Oswald, 5 December 2012

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Happiness is approximately U-shaped across a person’s life. It has been known for more than two decades by behavioural scientists and wellbeing researchers that human happiness and mental health appear to follow a large, looping, U-shaped trajectory through the main part of people’s lives (cf. Feddersen, Metcalfe, and Wooden 2012).

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: happiness, mid-life, natural sciences

The costs of Hurricane Sandy: Life satisfaction as an alternative to GDP

John Feddersen, Robert Metcalfe, Mark Wooden, 2 November 2012

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Early forecasts suggest that Hurricane Sandy won’t influence US GDP much, positively or negatively. For example, IHS Global Insight estimates a reduction of 0.5% in the final quarter of 2012, while Capital Economics believes the rebuilding effort may actually increase GDP.

Topics: Environment, Frontiers of economic research
Tags: catastrophes, happiness, Hurricane Sandy, wellbeing

Aspirations, wellbeing, risk-aversion, and loss-aversion

Kees Koedijk, Meir Statman, Rachel Campbell, 30 March 2012

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“Rich or poor, it’s always nice to have money”, as the old saying goes. But rich is relative, as US Congressman John Flemming recently demonstrated in an on-the-air MSNBC interview. He complained about taxes that were so high that “by the time I feed my family, I have maybe $400,000 left over”.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: happiness, life satisfaction, wellbeing

Beautiful people earn more... and are moreover happier

Bruno S Frey, Jana Gallus, 21 March 2012

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The world appears to be unfair. Those who are prettier are more successful in the labour market and therewith earn a higher salary. On the marriage market, too, the beautiful succeed more easily than those who are not that blessed with their looks. These properties have recently been termed "erotic capital", to add to the economic, cultural, human and social capitals.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Labour markets
Tags: beauty, happiness, labour market, life satisfaction, marriage market

Unhappiness and job finding

Jan van Ours, Anne Gielen, 13 February 2012

Vox readers can download CEPR Discussion Paper 8842 for free here

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: http://www.cepr.org/DP8842
Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Labour markets
Tags: Active Labour market policy, Germany, happiness, unemployment

Happiness economics: Can we have an economy of wellbeing?

Carol Graham, 31 July 2011

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At this year’s American Economics Association annual meetings in Denver, there were the usual panels on topics ranging from the international exchange-rate regime to the roots of the global financial crisis to trends in the real-estate market in the US. More unusual was a keynote session on whether happiness measures should replace gross national product.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: happiness, Happiness economics, wellbeing

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