The fiscal consequences of unrestricted immigration from Romania and Bulgaria

Joakim Ruist, 18 January 2014

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Since 1 January, citizens of Romania and Bulgaria have the same freedom of movement inside the European Union as citizens of other member states.

Topics: EU policies, Europe's nations and regions, Migration, Welfare state and social Europe
Tags: fiscal burden, immigration policy, public finance

The long term economic impacts of reducing migration

Katerina Lisenkova, 10 January 2014

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The large influx of immigrants following the accession of eastern European countries to the EU in 2004 brought migration policy to the forefront of the public agenda and political debate. Large net migration flows are a relatively recent phenomenon in the UK; consistent positive net migration numbers have only been observed since the 1990s.

Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Labour markets, Migration
Tags: fiscal burden, immigration policy, UK

Sale of visas: A smuggler’s final song?

Emmanuelle Auriol, Alice Mesnard, 4 June 2012

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Each year, an estimated 2,000 people drowned on their migrant’s journey from Africa to Europe (The Economist 2005) and many more on other routes.  Not only is crossing borders illegally a dangerous operation but it also entails very high financial costs.

Topics: Migration
Tags: human smuggling, immigration policy, visas

What Drives U.S. Immigration Policy? Evidence from Congressional Roll Call Votes

Giovanni Facchini, Max Steinhardt, 21 March 2011

Vox users can download CEPR Discussion Paper 8299 for free here. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP8299.asp
Topics: Migration, Politics and economics
Tags: immigration policy, Political Economy, voting

Global economic slumps and migration

Timothy J Hatton, Jeffrey G. Williamson, 29 April 2009

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Today’s global economic crisis has turned a media spotlight on immigration. Sagging labour markets have led to calls for even tougher restrictions on potential competition from immigrant workers, and ballooning fiscal deficits have heightened fears about the added burden to welfare states. Will immigration pressure increase or decline during the slump? Will we see a policy backlash?

Topics: Migration
Tags: , 10% rule, a&b, global crisis, immigration policy, sadfsdfdsaf-%6asdf, test, test2

From attitudes towards immigration to immigration policy outcomes: Does public opinion rule?

Giovanni Facchini, Anna Maria Mayda , 21 June 2008

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Several recent studies (Anderson and Winters 2008, World Bank 2006) have pointed out that substantial gains can be achieved from the liberalisation of international migration flows, both for sending and receiving countries.1

Topics: Migration
Tags: immigration policy, Median Voter, pro-immigration interest groups

How individual attitudes are mapped into immigration policy outcomes

Giovanni Facchini, Anna Maria Mayda , 27 May 2008

According to recent estimates, about 11 million individuals migrate each year. Although this might look as a large number, it implies that worldwide only one in six hundred individuals changes country of residence over a twelve months period.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6835.asp
Topics: Migration
Tags: immigration, immigration policy, Interest Groups, Median Voter, Political Economy

Selective immigration policy: will it work?

Timothy J Hatton, 14 February 2008

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It is widely believed that Europe admits too many low-skilled and too few high-skilled immigrants. For more than a decade, immigration researchers have championed the idea that the countries of the EU should adopt the kind of immigration points system for which Australia and Canada are famous. Britain and France have already taken steps in that direction.

Topics: Labour markets, Migration
Tags: EU, immigration policy, skilled migrants

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