The price of rights: Key policy trade-offs towards migrant workers

Martin Ruhs interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam,

Date Published

Wed, 11/12/2014

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See Also

Ruhs, M (2014) The Price of Rights: Regulating International Labor Migration, Princeton University Press.

Winner of the 2014 Best Book Award, Migration and Citizenship Section of the American Political Science Association

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Topics

Migration
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immigration policy, Human rights, welfare

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When

September 2014

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The fiscal consequences of unrestricted immigration from Romania and Bulgaria

Joakim Ruist 18 January 2014

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Since 1 January, citizens of Romania and Bulgaria have the same freedom of movement inside the European Union as citizens of other member states. The approaching end to transnational restrictions caused intense public debate in several of the richer EU countries during the past year, stoked by fears that large numbers of poor Romanians and Bulgarians would migrate to the richer EU countries and impose a heavy burden on public finances.

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Topics:  EU policies Europe's nations and regions Migration Welfare state and social Europe

Tags:  immigration policy, fiscal burden, public finance

The long term economic impacts of reducing migration

Katerina Lisenkova 10 January 2014

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The large influx of immigrants following the accession of eastern European countries to the EU in 2004 brought migration policy to the forefront of the public agenda and political debate. Large net migration flows are a relatively recent phenomenon in the UK; consistent positive net migration numbers have only been observed since the 1990s. During the 2010 election campaign, the senior partner of the current UK coalition government (the Conservative Party) set their migration policy target to reduce the level of net migration from “hundreds of thousands to tens of thousands”.

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Topics:  Europe's nations and regions Labour markets Migration

Tags:  immigration policy, UK, fiscal burden

Sale of visas: A smuggler’s final song?

Emmanuelle Auriol, Alice Mesnard 04 June 2012

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Each year, an estimated 2,000 people drowned on their migrant’s journey from Africa to Europe (The Economist 2005) and many more on other routes.  Not only is crossing borders illegally a dangerous operation but it also entails very high financial costs. For border crossings such as from Mexico to the US, human smugglers can charge up to $4,000, while trans-pacific crossings of Chinese immigrants to the US cost above $35,000 in the mid-90s and have since increased sharply.

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Topics:  Migration

Tags:  immigration policy, visas, human smuggling

What Drives U.S. Immigration Policy? Evidence from Congressional Roll Call Votes

Giovanni Facchini, Max Steinhardt,

Date Published

Mon, 03/21/2011

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Topics

Migration Politics and economics

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URL

www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP8299.asp

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immigration policy, voting, Political Economy

Global economic slumps and migration

Timothy J Hatton, Jeffrey G. Williamson 29 April 2009

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Today’s global economic crisis has turned a media spotlight on immigration. Sagging labour markets have led to calls for even tougher restrictions on potential competition from immigrant workers, and ballooning fiscal deficits have heightened fears about the added burden to welfare states. Will immigration pressure increase or decline during the slump? Will we see a policy backlash? What can history tell us?

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Topics:  Migration

Tags:  test, immigration policy, global crisis, 10% rule, a&b, test2, sadfsdfdsaf-%6asdf,

From attitudes towards immigration to immigration policy outcomes: Does public opinion rule?

Giovanni Facchini, Anna Maria Mayda 21 June 2008

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Several recent studies (Anderson and Winters 2008, World Bank 2006) have pointed out that substantial gains can be achieved from the liberalisation of international migration flows, both for sending and receiving countries.1 At the same time, recent estimates (Goldin and Reinert 2006), suggest that only 11 million individuals, i.e. just one in six hundred migrate each year. The stock of migrants is larger.

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Topics:  Migration

Tags:  immigration policy, Median Voter, pro-immigration interest groups

How individual attitudes are mapped into immigration policy outcomes

Giovanni Facchini, Anna Maria Mayda ,

Date Published

Tue, 05/27/2008

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According to recent estimates, about 11 million individuals migrate each year. Although this might look as a large number, it implies that worldwide only one in six hundred individuals changes country of residence over a twelve months period. Provided that the income gap between poor sending countries and rich destination countries continues to be very pronounced and transport and communication costs have drastically declined compared to one hundred years ago, it appears that restrictive migration policies are key determinants of the limited flows actually observed.

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Selective immigration policy: will it work?

Timothy J Hatton 14 February 2008

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It is widely believed that Europe admits too many low-skilled and too few high-skilled immigrants. For more than a decade, immigration researchers have championed the idea that the countries of the EU should adopt the kind of immigration points system for which Australia and Canada are famous. Britain and France have already taken steps in that direction. And last October the European Commission entered the fray when it unveiled a Blue Card scheme, along the lines of the US Green Card, with the aim of attracting highly skilled immigrants.1

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Topics:  Labour markets Migration

Tags:  EU, immigration policy, skilled migrants

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