Brain drain or brain gain? Evidence from corporate boards

Mariassunta Giannetti , Guanmin Liao, Xiaoyun Yu, 3 January 2013

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Development economists have long warned about the costs for developing countries of the emigration of the best and brightest that decamp to universities and businesses in the developed world (Bhagwati 1976). This brain drain has attracted a considerable amount of economic research. 

Topics: Development
Tags: brain drain, brain gain, corporate governance

Do highly skilled migrants return permanently to their home countries?

Patrick Gaulé, 14 December 2010

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Many countries are concerned about losing their best scientists, engineers, and other skilled workers to emigration to foreign countries and the US in particular. It is plainly the case that many skilled workers cross national borders. The evidence regarding the brain drain from Europe to the US is surveyed in Saint-Paul (2008).

Topics: Development, Migration
Tags: academics, brain drain, Labour Markets, US

What are the consequences for development of the most highly skilled migrating?

John Gibson, David McKenzie, 12 August 2010

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If you were born in the Pacific Islands or the Caribbean and have a university education, the chances are that you have moved abroad – well over half do so (Beineet al. 2008). High-skilled migration is also commonplace in a number of larger developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

Topics: Development, Migration
Tags: brain drain, high-skilled migration, Pacific

Migration in Latin America: Answering old questions with new data

Bárbara Castelletti, Jeff Dayton-Johnson, Ángel Melguizo, 19 March 2010

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Does immigration reduce the wages of domestic workers? Are immigrants a substitute for a country’s labour force, thereby pushing up unemployment rates for native-born workers? Are they net beneficiaries of the welfare state?

Topics: Migration
Tags: brain drain, immigration, Latin America and the Caribbean

The European brain drain: European workers living in the US

Gilles Saint-Paul, 24 December 2008

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Since 1995, America has grown faster while enjoying lower unemployment than Europe. Adding to Europe's growth angst are worries about aging populations, its inability to adapt to technical change, the burden of its welfare state, and the pains of labour market deregulation. A particular worry is that Europe is losing its most talented workers to the US.

Topics: Migration
Tags: brain drain, European Monetary Union, US

Brain Drained: A Tale of Two Countries

Dan Ben-David, 14 March 2008

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While the number of European scholars in America ranges from one to four percent of the scholars in their individual home countries, 73% of those who earn their PhDs in the States indicate a desire to stay there (European Commission, 2003).

Topics: Education, Migration
Tags: academic migration, brain drain, higher education, Israel, U.S. universities

Brain Drained: Soaring Minds

Dan Ben-David, 13 March 2008

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The brain drain is no longer merely a concern about outmigration from developing to developed countries. As border barriers to individuals whose skills are in demand fall, a greater number of those who can move are choosing to do so, particularly in academia.

Topics: Education, Migration
Tags: academic migration, brain drain, foreign scholars, Israel, US universities

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