Trevon D. Logan, John M. Parman, Monday, March 9, 2015

Racial disparities in socioeconomic conditions remain a major policy issue throughout the world. This column applies a new neighbour-based measure of residential segregation to US census data from 1880 and 1940. The authors find that existing measures understate the extent of segregation, and that segregation increased in rural as well as urban areas. The dramatic decline in opposite-race neighbours during the 20th century may help to explain the persistence of racial inequality in the US.

Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez, Tuesday, February 4, 2014

The US is supposed to be the land of opportunity. This column presents evidence that is better thought of as the ‘lands of opportunity’. Economic mobility varies dramatically across US cities. Some have upward-income mobility comparable to the most mobile countries in the world. Others have rates below that of any developed country. These geographical differences are correlated with five factors: segregation, income inequality, local school quality, social capital, and family structure.

Alberto Alesina, Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, Monday, September 15, 2008

Research on a large new dataset suggests that regional segregation within a country is associated with worse government – even after controlling for reverse causality.

Antonio Cabrales, Yves Zenou, Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Producing research is an increasingly collaborative and social effort. This column summarises a model of production that may explain how academic researchers find co-authors – and segregate amongst themselves.