Perverse consequences of well-intentioned regulation: Evidence from India’s child-labour ban

Prashant Bharadwaj, Leah Lakdawala, Nicholas Li, 5 December 2013

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Despite decades of near universal opposition to it, child labour is endemic. According to a recent report by the International Labour Organization, there are nearly 168 million child labourers, of whom 85 million work under hazardous conditions (ILO 2013).

There are many policy options to readdress this. Bans and regulations against child labour are among the most popular worldwide.

Topics: Development
Tags: child labour, India

Child labour: Is international activism the solution or the problem?

Matthias Doepke, Fabrizio Zilibotti, 12 October 2009

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Ever since children toiled in the mines and factories of Britain during the Industrial Revolution, industrialisation and economic development have stirred humanitarian concern about child labour. The first child-labour regulations (the British Factory Acts of the early 1800s) were aimed at the appalling working conditions children suffered in textile mills.

Topics: Development
Tags: activism, child labour, developing countries

The eradication of child labour in the United States in the early twentieth century: Lessons for developing economies

Juan Manuel Puerta, 2 August 2008

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In recent years, there has been a renewed interest for the issue of child labour.1 An illustration of this trend is given by the sharp increase in the number of empirical papers addressing the topic (Edmonds, 2007).

Topics: Development
Tags: child labour, Political Economy, poverty trap, US

Child labour: lessons from the Industrial Revolution

Jane Humphries, 24 April 2008

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Societies have long sought to eliminate child labour.

Topics: Development, Economic history, Labour markets
Tags: child labour, family economics, Industrial Revolution

Trade and child labour

Eric Edmonds, Nina Pavcnik, 19 July 2007

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Iqbal Masih was born in 1982 near Lahore Pakistan. At age four, Iqbal began working a carpet loom for at least 12 hours a day, six days a week. His parents received an advance on his wages, so Iqbal was bonded to his employer. Iqbal could not leave, and his employer chained him to his loom in order to make sure he did not run away. At age 10, Iqbal escaped.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: child labour, family economics, trade

Are developing countries engaging in “social dumping”?

Guillermo de la Dehesa, 24 May 2007

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Increasingly, the charge of “social dumping” is heard as a rational for protectionist measures against developing country exports. Many businessmen, labour unions and politicians in developed nations believe that lax working regulations and conditions, as well as weak political and social rights, provide developing-country exports with an unfair advantage.

Topics: Development
Tags: child labour, labour standards, social dumping

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