Do Prices Determine Vertical Integration? Evidence from Trade Policy

Laura Alfaro, Paola Conconi, Harald Fadinger, Andrew Newman,

Date Published

Sun, 10/28/2012

a

A

Show in Editors Choice Box?

0

Display Order

0

Topics

Industrial organisation

Partners

CEPR

URL

www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP9200.asp

Vox readers can download DP9200 for free here.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Home Page

Display Order

0

cepr_featured

0
Tags
property rights, industrial organisation, vertical integration

Women's Inheritance: Evidence from India

Klaus Deininger, Aparajita Goyal, Hari Nagarajan 03 December 2010

a

A

Policymakers should aim to improve women’s position relative to men’s – not only is it fairer, but it is also more efficient, according to those in favour such initiatives (see for example Duflo 2003).

a

A

Topics:  Development Labour markets Poverty and income inequality

Tags:  India, gender inequality, property rights

Reforming property rights

Tim Besley, Maitreesh Ghatak 22 April 2009

a

A

Whether they thought private property was a sine qua non of a free society or organised theft, classical economists, from Adam Smith (1776) to Karl Marx (1891), accorded a central position to the role of property rights or the “relations of production” in the process of economic development. However, it is only recently that mainstream modern economics has come around to this point of view. The cheerful view of economists about the efficiency of competitive markets assumes that property rights are well-defined and well-enforced.

a

A

Topics:  Development

Tags:  property rights, Hernando de Soto

Expropriations of foreign-owned oil assets more likely with high oil prices and weak political institutions

Sergei Guriev, Konstantin Sonin, Anton Kolotilin,

Date Published

Tue, 03/25/2008

a

A

Show in Editors Choice Box?

0

Display Order

0

Topics

Energy

Partners

CEPR

URL

http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6755.asp

In recent years we have witnessed a phenomenon that has not been observed since the 1970s: the forced nationalization of major, foreign-owned oil assets in Venezuela, Bolivia, Russia and Kazakhstan. Due to economies of scale and better human capital, multinational oil companies have been more efficient and expropriations often give rise to losses of output and national income. In Mexico in 1938 and in Iran in 1951 expropriations not only resulted in a decline on the growth rates, but were also followed by a decline in output and wages in the industry.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Home Page

Display Order

-10

cepr_featured

0
Tags
property rights, nationalization, oil industry

Events