Say on pay in the UK: Modest effect, even after the crisis

Ian Gregory-Smith, Steve Thompson, Peter Wright, 24 March 2014

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The extensive academic literature on the growth of executive compensation has tended to polarise around one of two positions: the rents-capture view and the optimal contracting approach. These analyses lead to very different positions on the value of a ‘say on pay’ policy:

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Labour markets, Microeconomic regulation, Poverty and income inequality
Tags: corporate governance, Executive compensation, executive pay, UK, voting

What voters reward: Evidence from the 2009 Indian parliamentary elections

Poonam Gupta, Arvind Panagariya, 17 March 2014

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Despite the intuitive appeal of the idea that good economic outcomes such as sustained rapid growth should help incumbents win elections, evidence on it has been scant, especially from developing countries.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: democracy, India, voting

Voting to tell others

Stefano DellaVigna, John List, Ulrike Malmendier, Gautam Rao, 5 March 2014

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Why do people vote? This seemingly simple question has intrigued social scientists for decades. The classical model of pivotal voting proposes that individuals vote because they may affect the outcome of the election (Downs 1957). But any single individual becomes very unlikely to affect the outcome of a large election, and yet people still vote in congressional and presidential elections.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: social image motivation to vote, voting

Guns and votes: The victory of an intense minority against an apathetic majority

Laurent Bouton, Paola Conconi, Francisco J Pino, Maurizio Zanardi, 9 December 2013

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On 14 December 2012, 20 children and six staff members were murdered in a shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: gun control, voting

Happiness and voting

Federica Liberini, Eugenio Proto, Michela Redoano, 15 November 2013

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The idea that states should support and protect citizens’ wellbeing goes back at least two hundred and fifty years – as stated in the 1776 US Declaration of Independence.1

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: happiness, subjective wellbeing, voting

Papal conclave: A new hope?

Nicolas Boccard, 2 April 2013

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The media coverage surrounding the 2013 papal conclave revealed Italy held about a fifth of the votes and the US about a tenth – figures that seem somehow large relative to the global billion of Catholics. Indeed, the Catholic church has been criticised for failing to give an adequate voice to the global south, which now garners a majority of Catholics.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: Papal conclave, voting

What’s a vote worth?

John Gibson, 2 November 2012

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Next week, America goes to the polls. Based on recent presidential elections, more than one-third of eligible voters will not cast a ballot. The figure for general elections in the UK is similar, which is actually a recovery since 2001 when just over 40% of registered voters did not vote.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: election 2012, US election, voting

What Drives U.S. Immigration Policy? Evidence from Congressional Roll Call Votes

Giovanni Facchini, Max Steinhardt, 21 March 2011

Vox users can download CEPR Discussion Paper 8299 for free here. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP8299.asp
Topics: Migration, Politics and economics
Tags: immigration policy, Political Economy, voting

The Irish ‘no’: Plan B

Daniel Gros, 16 June 2008

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The official mantra after the No in Ireland seems to become “let us continue with the ratification process”. This is a high risk strategy since Ireland’s veto power will continue even if all other 26 ratify. The Irish electorate will know this and thus have little reason or incentive to vote differently at second referendum.

Topics: EU institutions, Politics and economics
Tags: European Council, Ireland, nuclear option, voting

The opiate of the elites

Andrew Gelman, David Park, Boris Shor, Jeronimo Cortina, 21 April 2008

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Barack Obama attracted attention recently by describing small-town Americans who were “bitter” at economic prospects who “cling to guns or religion’’ in frustration. This statement, made during the height of the Democratic nomination battle, has received a lot of attention, but it represents a common view.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: conservative parties, Democrats, religion, Republicans, social class, US, voting

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