How unequal is the European Parliament’s representation?

Anish Tailor, Nicolas Véron, 21 May 2014

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This week’s European Parliament election (22–25 May) has several unprecedented features. Most importantly, the main pan-European parties are fielding lead candidates for European Commission President.

Topics: EU institutions, Politics and economics
Tags: democracy, elections, EU, European parliament, Inequality, treaty change, voting

Will voters turn out in the 2014 European Parliamentary elections?

Owen McDougall, Ashoka Mody, 17 May 2014

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The extent of voter turnout in the 2014 European Parliamentary (EP) election is widely viewed as a critical test for European democracy. Turnout in the EP elections has steadily declined over three decades, from 62% in the first election in 1979 to 43% in the 2009 election (EP Liaison Office undated).

Topics: EU institutions, Politics and economics
Tags: democracy, ECB, elections, EU, European parliament, trust, turnout, voting

Newspaper readership, civic attitudes, and economic development: Evidence from the history of African media

Julia Cagé, Valeria Rueda, 14 May 2014

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Poor governance due to lack of political accountability is often cited as an explanation for the low level of economic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Lack of political accountability can emerge when voters do not choose their candidates according to their expected performance.

Topics: Development, Economic history, Institutions and economics, Politics and economics
Tags: accountability, Africa, democracy, development, media, religion, technology, voting

How to address inequality

Jeffrey Frankel, 29 April 2014

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Inequality has received a lot of attention lately, particularly in two arenas where it had not previously received as much: American public debate and the International Monetary Fund.

Topics: Politics and economics, Poverty and income inequality
Tags: Inequality, Political Economy, redistribution, US, voting

Say on pay in the UK: Modest effect, even after the crisis

Ian Gregory-Smith, Steve Thompson, Peter Wright, 24 March 2014

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The extensive academic literature on the growth of executive compensation has tended to polarise around one of two positions: the rents-capture view and the optimal contracting approach. These analyses lead to very different positions on the value of a ‘say on pay’ policy:

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Labour markets, Microeconomic regulation, Poverty and income inequality
Tags: corporate governance, Executive compensation, executive pay, UK, voting

What voters reward: Evidence from the 2009 Indian parliamentary elections

Poonam Gupta, Arvind Panagariya, 17 March 2014

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Despite the intuitive appeal of the idea that good economic outcomes such as sustained rapid growth should help incumbents win elections, evidence on it has been scant, especially from developing countries.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: democracy, India, voting

Voting to tell others

Stefano DellaVigna, John List, Ulrike Malmendier, Gautam Rao, 5 March 2014

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Why do people vote? This seemingly simple question has intrigued social scientists for decades. The classical model of pivotal voting proposes that individuals vote because they may affect the outcome of the election (Downs 1957). But any single individual becomes very unlikely to affect the outcome of a large election, and yet people still vote in congressional and presidential elections.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: social image motivation to vote, voting

Guns and votes: The victory of an intense minority against an apathetic majority

Laurent Bouton, Paola Conconi, Francisco J Pino, Maurizio Zanardi, 9 December 2013

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On 14 December 2012, 20 children and six staff members were murdered in a shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

Topics: Politics and economics
Tags: gun control, voting

Happiness and voting

Federica Liberini, Eugenio Proto, Michela Redoano, 15 November 2013

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The idea that states should support and protect citizens’ wellbeing goes back at least two hundred and fifty years – as stated in the 1776 US Declaration of Independence.1

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: happiness, subjective wellbeing, voting

Papal conclave: A new hope?

Nicolas Boccard, 2 April 2013

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The media coverage surrounding the 2013 papal conclave revealed Italy held about a fifth of the votes and the US about a tenth – figures that seem somehow large relative to the global billion of Catholics. Indeed, the Catholic church has been criticised for failing to give an adequate voice to the global south, which now garners a majority of Catholics.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Politics and economics
Tags: Papal conclave, voting

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