Our uneconomic methods of measuring economic research

Stan Liebowitz, 6 December 2013

a

A

In the movie Moneyball, a nerdy Ivy League economics major, working for a general manager played by Brad Pitt, found undervalued baseball players by applying clear-headed logic and statistical techniques.1 Many economists watching this movie probably felt a tinge of pride in seeing our tools portrayed as rigorously objective.

Topics: Education
Tags: academia, citations, journals, productivity, publication, research

Citations: Caution, context, common sense

David Laband, 11 September 2013

a

A

Let me start with a confession. I like and use citations. Does this really make me a bad person? I don’t think so, for reasons that are fundamentally economic and that are reflected in a conversation I had three decades ago with Tom Borcherding, the former longtime editor of Economic Inquiry.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: citations

Free availability and diffusion of scientific articles

Patrick Gaulé, Nicolas Maystre, 23 June 2009

a

A

With the advent of electronic publishing, the cost of distributing scientific articles has fallen sharply. Yet journal prices have steadily increased, particularly those of for-profit journals, which charge roughly 3 times more than journals run by scientific societies (Dewatripont et al. 2007).

Topics: Education
Tags: citations, open access, scientific articles

Networking, citation of academic research, and premature death

Joshua Aizenman, Kenneth Kletzer, 30 April 2008

a

A

One approach for measuring the impact and diffusion of academic research is by studying the quantity and pattern of citations to published research findings. The literature on the diffusion of technological innovations frequently uses patent citation data to study the spread of technological knowledge (for example, the volume by Jaffe and Trajtenberg (2002)).

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: academic research, citations, scholarly publications

Vox eBooks

Events