Joshua Aizenman, Mahir Binici, Michael M Hutchison, Friday, April 4, 2014

In 2013, policymakers began discussing when and how to ‘taper’ the Federal Reserve’s quantitative easing policy. This column presents evidence on the effect of Fed officials’ public statements on emerging-market financial conditions. Statements by Chairman Bernanke had a large effect on asset prices, whereas the market largely ignored statements by Fed Presidents. Emerging markets with stronger fundamentals experienced larger stock-market declines, larger increases in credit default swap spreads, and larger currency depreciations than countries with weaker fundamentals.

Guntram Wolff, Sunday, October 30, 2011

Stress in the interbank market has increased dramatically since July 2011, and bank stock market valuations have fallen by 22% on average for 60 of the most important banks subject to stress tests. This column argues that bank stock valuation has been affected by the banks’ exposure to Greek debt and that Greek banks were particularly affected. Holdings of debt of the other four periphery countries does not, however, appear to be a strong determinant of stock price movements.

Christoph Moser, Andrew K Rose, Monday, September 12, 2011

How the costs and benefits of regional trade agreements are distributed is a controversial question among economists. CEPR DP8566 analyses the stock market response to a country's signing of an RTA. The authors find that the biggest 'bounce' occurs in a country's stock market when it signs an RTA with an already-strong trading partner, or when the country is poor.

Heiko Hesse, Thursday, October 16, 2008

This column examines the impact of stock market valuation changes on consumption and investment in emerging markets. Though the effects are smaller than those in advanced economies, emerging market policymakers ought to pay attention to how equity price swings will transmit business cycles and impact aggregate demand.

John Turner , Graeme Acheson , Charles Hickson, Qing Ye, Saturday, May 10, 2008

Past performance is no guarantee, but history tells us that the equity risk premium has been persistent. This column shows that British investors enjoyed relatively high returns in the nineteenth century, though today’s UK market differs greatly from its formative ancestor.

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