More to do on measuring hunger

Joachim De Weerdt, Kathleen Beegle, Jed Friedman, John Gibson, 18 February 2014

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One of the first Millennium Development Goals is to reduce hunger by half between 1990 and 2015. To date, the global hunger count has fallen slightly, from 1 billion in 1990–1992 to 870 million in 2010–2012 (Food and Agriculture Organization 2013). As a proportion of the world’s population, this is just a one-third fall in the hunger rate, from 19% to 13%.

Topics: Poverty and income inequality
Tags: Africa, development, food, hunger, measurement error, Millennium Development Goals, Poverty, surveys, Tanzania

GDP and life satisfaction: New evidence

Eugenio Proto, Aldo Rustichini, 11 January 2014

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A commission on the measurement of economic performance and social progress was created on the French government’s initiative. Since 2008, this distinguished group of social scientists has put subjective well-being into the limelight as a possible supplement to traditional measures of development such as GDP (Stiglitz et al. 2009).

Topics: Development, Frontiers of economic research
Tags: development, Easterlin paradox, growth, happiness, national income, subjective well-being

Government quality and spatial inequality: A cross-country analysis

Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, Roberto Ezcurra, 29 November 2013

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Spatial inequality has received considerable attention from both scholars and politicians in the last two decades, coinciding with advances in globalisation.

Topics: Poverty and income inequality
Tags: development, government institutions, spatial inequality

AGOA rules: The intended and unintended consequences of special fabric provisions

Lawrence Edwards, Robert Z. Lawrence, 20 November 2013

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The US and EU often claim credit for granting duty-free quota-free access to products from the least developed countries. Such preferential treatment is of interest not only because it might provide one-time benefits in the form of higher incomes and increased employment, but also because trade is often associated with dynamic benefits that lead to faster growth and development.

Topics: Development, International trade
Tags: Africa, development, quotas, tariffs

Growth still is good for the poor

David Dollar, Tatjana Kleineberg, Aart Kraay, 19 November 2013

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With the formulation of the Post-2015 Development Agenda in full swing, it is important to reassess how and to what extent new development challenges should be reflected in the agenda. A key part of the soon-expiring Millennium Development Goals aimed at halving absolute poverty – as defined by the World Bank's $1.25/day standard – between 1990 and 2015.

Topics: Development
Tags: development, growth, Inequality, Millennium Development Goals, Poverty, World Bank

Long-term barriers to growth

Enrico Spolaore, Romain Wacziarg, 3 October 2013

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Students of comparative development have turned their focus to factors rooted deeper and deeper in history.

Topics: Development, Economic history
Tags: ancestry, Culture, development, geography, growth, technology transfer

Ethnic inequality

Alberto Alesina, Stelios Michalopoulos, Elias Papaioannou, 18 November 2012

Vox readers can download CEPR Discussion Paper 9225 for free here.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

URL: www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP9225.asp
Topics: Development, Poverty and income inequality
Tags: development, diversity, ethnicity, geography, Inequality

Colonialism and development in Africa

Leander Heldring, James A Robinson, 10 January 2013

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The Berlin Conference of 1884-1885 formalised what has become known as the ‘Scramble for Africa’. European powers arbitrarily divided up Africa between themselves and started administrating their new colonies. Seventy years later they bequeathed to native Africans countries that looked remarkably different from how they looked in 1880.

Topics: Development, Economic history
Tags: Africa, colonialism, development

What economic model is Egypt going to adopt?

Mohsin Khan, 8 November 2012

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The dramatic political developments since the Arab Spring have generated uncertainty and subsequent debate over the future of economic policies and economic reforms in the Arab world. This column asks:

Topics: Development, Global crisis, Politics and economics
Tags: Africa, development, Egypt, growth, Middle East

Development effectiveness after the Arab Spring: Challenges ahead

Emmanuel Frot, Anders Olofsgård, Maria Perrotta, 26 October 2012

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The new consensus in development cooperation, first launched in the 2005 Paris Declaration and known as the ‘Aid Effectiveness Agenda’, stresses the importance of ownership, alignment, harmonisation, and result focus. This is not the first time donors have commited to improved practices or an increase in funds, though, and the past track record is mixed at best.

Topics: Development
Tags: aid, Arab Spring, development, East Europe

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