Minimum wages: the effects on employment and labour-force turnover

Pierre Brochu, David A Green, 22 January 2014

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On 14 January 2014 a group of 75 economists, including seven Nobel laureates, released a letter calling for an increase in the US minimum wage (Woellert 2014). At the same time, George Osborne, the Conservative Chancellor of the Exchequer in the UK, has called for the minimum wage in that country to rise by more than the rate of inflation this year (BBC 2014).

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: employment, Labour Markets, minimum wage

Hollowing out and the future of the labour market – the myth

Bob Butcher, 17 December 2013

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The 'hollowing out' thesis argues that intermediate-level jobs have been disappearing, and are replaced by a rise in low-level and in high-level jobs, and that this is primarily due to technology replacing routine jobs. That position, however, does not match what is seen in reality.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: hollowing out, Labour Markets, medium-level jobs

Does offshoring hurt domestic innovation activities?

Bernhard Dachs, Bernd Ebersberger, Steffen Kinkel, Oliver Som, 7 September 2013

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Offshoring of production activities has been a topic of economic policy debates for at least the last decade. A central issue in these debates are the economic effects of offshoring on firms in the home country.

Topics: Productivity and Innovation
Tags: Labour Markets, offshoring, R&D

Small isn’t always beautiful: The cost of French regulation

Luis Garicano, John Van Reenen, 30 May 2013

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Slow growth in Europe has led to a debate over whether structural reforms can be used to raise productivity (see Costello et al. 2009, Crafts 2012). Many countries have tough labour regulations which may be a barrier to growth.

Topics: Europe's nations and regions, Labour markets
Tags: Eurozone crisis, France, Labour Markets

Preparing to export

Danielken Molina, Marc Muendler, 27 May 2013

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Exporting is an essential feature of strategies for economic development for very good reasons. A large body of empirical evidence shows that exporters are larger, more productive, pay higher wages and hire more skilled workers (Bernard and Jensen 1995). But do firms move from local sales to export sales? What choices do firms make in preparation for exporting?

Topics: Development
Tags: exports, firms, Labour Markets

Why the jobs problem is not going away

Richard Dobbs, Anu Madgavkar, 19 September 2012

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Three years after the official end of the 'Great Recession', millions of workers across advanced economies remain unemployed. The US and UK unemployment rates remain above 8%; among Eurozone countries, unemployment exceeds 10% (US Bureau of Labor Statistics).

Topics: Global economy, Labour markets
Tags: global economy, Labour Markets, UK, US

Exploiting the enemy: The economic contribution of prisoner of war labour to Nazi Germany during WWII

Johann Custodis, 18 September 2012

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The subject of foreign and forced labour exploitation by the Third Reich is not one of meagre proportions. More than 14 million forced labourers passed through the Reich from 1939 to 1945, of whom 4.6 million had been prisoners of war (POWs).

Topics: Economic history, Frontiers of economic research, Labour markets
Tags: Labour Markets, Nazi Germany, prisoners of war, WWII

Artistic labour and occupational choice in Baroque painting

Federico Etro, 23 December 2011

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Exhibit 1. Caravaggio, The Fortune Teller, Paris, Louvre Museum ©

Topics: Frontiers of economic research, Labour markets
Tags: art, Baroque, Italy, Labour Markets, law of one price, painting

Making globalisation work for workers

Sascha O Becker, Marion Jansen, Marc Muendler, 1 October 2011

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On 23-24 June 2011, the ILO hosted a conference co-sponsored by CESifo, EFIGE, ILO and the World Bank and organised by the three of us. The conference featured frontier research into globalisation and labour markets. Keynote presentations were given by Elhanan Helpman (Harvard University) and David Autor (MIT).

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: globalisation, job losses, Labour Markets

Demographic pressure versus labour market space: A global view

Marga Peeters, Loek Groot, 2 August 2011

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Economists tend to study the problem of ageing in the developed countries in terms of rising old-age dependency ratios, which express the increasing higher number of pensioners for every working-age person. We can also apply the same reasoning to the young, where rising young-age dependency ratios in developing countries by definition implies more youngsters for every person of working age.

Topics: Labour markets
Tags: Ageing population, Demographic changes, Greece, Labour Markets, Poland, Turkey

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