Through the looking glass: CEO pay in China's listed companies

Alex Bryson, John Forth, Minghai Zhou 24 June 2014

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For many in the West China remains a paradox: a single-party Communist state with a vibrant, thriving economy set to challenge the US in the coming decade. Some have questioned the sustainability of the Chinese growth miracle in the absence of fully-fledged democracy and root-and-branch market reforms. But others point to state-sponsored decentralised market reforms over the past three decades as the key to China's success (Xu 2012).

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Topics:  Financial markets Labour markets

Tags:  China, executive pay, corporate governance, Executive compensation, CEOs

Say on pay in the UK: Modest effect, even after the crisis

Ian Gregory-Smith, Steve Thompson, Peter Wright 24 March 2014

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The extensive academic literature on the growth of executive compensation has tended to polarise around one of two positions: the rents-capture view and the optimal contracting approach. These analyses lead to very different positions on the value of a ‘say on pay’ policy:

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Labour markets Microeconomic regulation Poverty and income inequality

Tags:  voting, UK, executive pay, corporate governance, Executive compensation

New thinking on executive compensation: Pay CEOs with debt

Alex Edmans 13 July 2010

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The recent financial crisis saw CEOs undertake risky actions that cost bondholders billions of dollars. Examples included excessive subprime lending, over-expansion, or diversifying away from their core business into derivatives trading, as happened at Enron and AIG.

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Topics:  Financial markets Labour markets

Tags:  executive pay, inside debt, CEOs

The rise in American inequality

Ian Dew-Becker, Robert J. Gordon 19 June 2008

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Of all the economic debates with broad political implications, none competes with the puzzling rise in American income inequality since the late 1970s. Both economists and politicians disagree about the forest and the trees – the overall interpretation of rising inequality and the importance of individual causes. People argue about differences between data sources, about the causes of sinking relative incomes in the middle and bottom percentiles, and have especially contentious disagreements about the interpretation of the leap of relative incomes at the top end.

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Topics:  Labour markets

Tags:  income inequality, superstar economics, executive pay

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