US and them: The geography of academic research

Jishnu Das, Quy-Toan Do, 11 February 2014

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The world has globalised massively, but Bardhan (2003) and many others worry that academic publication has not. He asserts that researchers working on countries other than the US do not get a fair deal in the top economic journals.

Topics: Development, Frontiers of economic research
Tags: journals, publications, research

Challenging times in academia

John Hudson, 11 November 2013

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The world of academia has changed over the last forty years. In those far-off days university lecturers might write a paper every few years, and this served to sustain their position and reputation. Now, every eight years or so, academics and universities in the UK are subject to an evaluation of their work. This is just one of a number of similar exercises across the world (Abramo et al.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: economic research, journals, publications, REF

Nine facts about top journals in economics

David Card, Stefano DellaVigna, 21 January 2013

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Publications in the top journals have a powerful influence on the direction of research in economics, on the career paths of young researchers (Conley et al. 2011), and on the pay of academic economists. To what extent has the publication process in these journals changed over the past few decades? Remarkably little comprehensive evidence exists on the topic.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: journals, publications, research

World-leading economics research in Europe

Andrew J Oswald, 24 January 2009

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“Quality that is world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour…comparable to the best work in the field or sub-field whether conducted in the UK or elsewhere.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: Economics research, Europe, publications, UK

Evaluating journal performance using inside data

Ivan Cherkashin, Svetlana Demidova, Susumu Imai, Kala Krishna, 28 June 2008

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There are many uncertainties associated with publishing in economics. A paper must be written, find sympathetic referees who do not demand impossible revisions, be somehow (and often iteratively) revised to the referees’ satisfaction, be deemed acceptable by the editor, and finally published. At each stage, the process could end abruptly.

Topics: Frontiers of economic research
Tags: economic journals, editors, publications

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