Dani Rodrik, 28 January 2009

The global crisis is an opportunity for developing nations to project their interests in multilateral institutions, and gain influence in shaping economic globalisation. To make the best of this outcome, developing nations need a good sense of their interests and priorities, but also to recognize that having a greater say entails acceptance of greater responsibilities.

Alberto Alesina, Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 15 September 2008

Research on a large new dataset suggests that regional segregation within a country is associated with worse government – even after controlling for reverse causality.

Benjamin Olken , 29 August 2008

Ben Olken of MIT talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his research on bribery in the Indonesian trucking industry – and the lessons for policy efforts to reduce corruption. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in New Orleans in January 2008.

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CEPR and the Paris School of Economics are jointly organizing (with financial assistance from Agence Nationale pour la Recherche, ANR) a one and a half day workshop focusing on conflicts, globalization and development. The workshop will take place at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne campus of the Paris School of Economics. Papers are being sought that focus on the following topics: · Causes and consequences of violent conflicts: civil wars, interstate wars, terrorism, rebellion... · Arms trade · International trade, capital flows and violent conflicts · Institutions and violent conflicts · Multilateral institutions and conflicts . Political versus economic causes of conflicts...

Hendrik P van Dalen, Mieke Reuser, 07 July 2008

Development assistance targeting health overwhelmingly concentrates on HIV/AIDS. This column argues that that focus neglects critical demographic issues and degrades health infrastructure, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. The prime rule for AIDS aid should be “First, do no harm”.

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The school intends to provide an intensive training course for Ph.D. students and young researchers who are working in the fields of international economics and development.

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EU Member States and the European Commission often assert that the EU's multiple trade preference schemes are a concrete manifestation of Europe's commitment to the development of poorer nations through trade. But what do we really know about the impact of these measures? Do they actually affect developing countries evenly? By how much? In this presentation Simon Evenett will provide a comprehensive yet accessible overview of the empirical findings concerning the operation of the EU's trade preference schemes. WIth a discussion grounded in the evidence base, he will assess if there is a gap between European aspirations and the outcomes on the ground. Implications will be drawn for European trade and development policies in general, including those initiatives associated with the Doha Round.

Axel Dreher, Dirk-Jan Koch, Peter Nunnenkamp, Rainer Thiele, 20 May 2008

How do NGOs spend their development assistance? This column discusses research showing that NGO aid is no better targeted to the neediest countries than state aid agencies either by choosing needier countries, or by entering un-chartered waters and trying to excel where state aid is most likely to fail.

Thierry Mayer, 21 April 2008

Finding explanations for cross-country differences in development levels is perhaps one of the most important questions in economics. CEPR DP6798 provides evidence that access to markets, measured as a theory-based index of market potential is an important factor in development.

Branko Milanovic, Peter H. Lindert, Jeffrey G. Williamson, 05 December 2007

Is inequality largely the result of the Industrial Revolution? Or were ancient incomes as unequal as they are today in poor pre-industrial societies? Looking at pre-industrial inequality from the Roman Empire in 14 AD to British India in 1947 generates new insights into the inequality and economic development connection over the very long run.

Art Durnev, Sergei Guriev, 21 November 2007

The consensus story: Resource abundance boosts GDP in the short-run but hinders or reverses the development of growth-enhancing institutions and thus long-run growth. New evidence suggests that this works by worsening corporate transparency, capital allocation and growth.

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